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About Vein Disorders

Varicose veins are a result of pressurization of small veins located below the skin. The cause of this pressurization is incompetent valves within veins themselves. This does not allow the normal antegrade (forward) flow of blood and results in blood reversing flow and thereby pressurizing veins. This is why these veins are more prominent in gravity dependant positions such as standing.

Vein Disorders Treatment

There are many kinds of vein disorders which can be treated by an experienced medical professional. These include:

  • Telangiectasia: A confluence of dilated, intradermal venules of less than 1mm in size. More commonly known as spider veins or thread veins, they can be pink, red, purple, or blue and occur in 15% of men and up to 25% of women.
  • Reticular veins: A dilated, blueish intradermal vein from 1mm to 3mm in diameter and are usually not painful.
  • Varicose veins: A subcutaneous dilated vein larger than 3mm in diameter is known as a varicose vein. They can occur in different regions of the body (typically the legs) and cause blood to pool in stagnant segments typically causing symptoms such as aching, pain, itching, and burning.
  • Superficial thrombophlebitis: A condition in which superficial veins clot and cause inflammation and induration of the overlying skin, erythema (redness), and warmth in the area surrounding the vein. This condition is usually self -limited and often is helped by anti- inflammatory medication.
  • Corona phlebectasia: Fan-shaped patterns of small intradermal veins on the inside or outside of the ankle and foot. Thought to be an early sign of advanced venous reflux disease or venous insuffiency.
  • Edema: This refers to tissue fluid in the skin and subcutaneous tissue and is often associated with venous disease but is also associated with other conditions such as congestive heart failure.
  • Hyperpigmentation: This bronze-brown or purple discoloration of the skin occurs in patients with venous disease and chronic inflammation.
  • Statis dermatitis: A type of dermatitis related to chronic venous in sufficiency, stasis dermatitis can cause a blistering, weeping, or scaling of the skin in the thighs, legs, and ankles.
  • Venous stasis ulcer: This refers to a wound in the legs and ankles related to chronic venous insuffiency. These ulcers can be quite stubborn to heal and will require an interdisciplinary approach to treatment.
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Vein Disorders

Varicose veins are a result of pressurization of small veins located below the skin. The cause of this pressurization is incompetent valves within veins themselves. This does not allow the normal antegrade (forward) flow...

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